The OKR Podcast
The OKR Podcast

Episode · 2 years ago

How OKRs helped give the GHX team the clarity to stay focused on value to customers

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ryan Padilla, Head of Global Planning at GHX, discusses the organization's experience with implementing the OKR practice and how OKRs helped give the GHX team the clarity to stay focused on value to customers.

You're listening to the Okur podcast, a show for leaders who want to unlock their organizations growth potential by leveraging the okaur technique and other cutting edge strategies. While many recognize the power of objectives and key results, okay ours to accelery outcomes and foster a growth and outcomes culture, there's a dearth of information on how to do them well and reap their full benefit. That's where this podcast comes in. Will help you learn to align and measure results pervasively, manage fast, to grow fast and, most importantly, achieve the powerful objectives you've identified. Here's your host day, dread Packnot, welcome to the OKARE podcast. We are delighted you're joining us today. Today we're going to have a conversation with Ryan Padilla, head of global planning at Ghx, and workboards own tiffany Morrissey. We're going to have a conversation about Ghx, is Ok our practice and how Ryan's approached the rollout of both the practice and the platform at his company. Ryan, Tiffany, welcome to you both. Let's get started, Ryan, with a bit about your rule at Gjx. My Rola jhx is to lead our global planning efforts. So once we de fine our strategic priorities, my role steps in the really think through how we operationalize and execute to deliver on the priorities that that we've defined in the organization. So we're highly cross functionally, many business leaders teams across the ORG to really make sure that we're defining the right outcomes and delivering those results in the business. Give you a little bit of history with our experience on Ok ours. So we're started two thousand and twenty. Were about a year into the process and if I rewind a year, we first decided to launch this methodology in the business. My role was brought about because we had a need in the organization to really improve our efforts with planning globally, cross functional alignment across the organization, and we felt that the OK our methodology was a great way for us to really drive some impacts and improven in the organization. I think we'd like to describe it as a two year journey and two thousand and nineteen our first year. I think we would look back and say was really foundational. We got a lot of the critical building blocks in place with launching the methodology a lot of coaching and training in the organization around what Ok ours are and what they're not, how how to build the right kind of OK ours have measurable key results that are outcome based. So I think we had a lot of success in getting the organization to understands why this could be impactful and how it was going to drive clarity in structure and the organization. This year now I think that we've got this in place. It's a lot of focus on advancing and maturing the process across the organization. So intended with launching this. We adopted...

...the work word tool and been really, really excited with the way that that brings this whole process to life in the organization. It's interesting to think back. You know now this has become our frame of reference right, but it's fun to actually do a retrospective on alignment and what things used to be like a jchx pre OK ours. I think we were probably typical of a lot of organizations. We have a lot of different functions, come close to twenty core functions in the business and had a lot of sideload functional planning in place and I think a lot of leaders were left to their own devices without some structure and a true process to figure out alignment, and alignment's hard. It continues to be hard. I think it's still an opportunity for us, but I think we we tackled it very at Hawk and we had hope, is our strategy a little bit, which was, hey, we expect the p these right people to get together and collaborate and Aligne and figure out what they need to do to deliver these results of the business. Often Times it wasn't successful. Right, no surprise. So with OK ours, I think it's really given us a foundation in a language to be intentional about alignment and, you know, full transparency. We was just still something that we're working to improve upon. You know, as two thousand and twenty is a year of advance, advancement for us, but I think this process is really given us structure and dedicated time and effort. Every quarter we're on a quarterly cadence with our OK our process and we go top to bottom across the organization. Right. So it starts with our executive team and you know, I can speak to meetings even this past week, right as we're planning through two thousand and twenty, where the executive team is getting together and talking through critical priorities and outcomes and then that translates management layer by management layer, very intentional and strategically down the organization to ensure that the teams at the very end of the process and the front line, whether you're somebody and customer support or somebody in our implement implementation team or one of our sales reps, there is clarity and a localization of the outcomes that each team is responsible for delivering. So I think we've made significant progress. So I think it's it's been pretty transformative. So you've had a few breakthroughs on accountability as well in terms of reducing the effort in improving the transparency. Can you describe your operations review in some of the improvements that have taken place with that? Yeah, I love sharing some of the stories and anecdotes from our our last year of adoption with OK ours. We've realized there's a lot of inefficiency. Again, probably not the only organization that would have that realization, but with this process I think really made a focused effort to address that right. That's something that we've all realized. As...

...a we think we can manufacture more time. It's just not reality. Right. There's so many things that we need to be focused on but like every organization, we've got finite resources and finite capital. Companies that are aligning those in the most effective ways with the companies that win. So that's a mentality shift for us that I think we've really tried to bleed into the organization and I think particularly at the at the leadership level, with a change in our management philosophy. One very specific example we used to have a monthly operating review. So it was sixty some stakeholders, big meeting held monthly, a lot of status updating and readoubt and people would define key initiative progress with stoplight status red, yellow, green, totally subjective. We realized hey, with this process of Ok ours, we've were already defining key results. We don't need to be redundant with this meeting and how it's structured. workboard gives us a great feature set with their business review part of the platform that enables us to really hone in on areas of risk with key results, and so we've completely transformed what was a massively expensive meeting across multiple layers of leadership in the organization, condensed it to an hour meeting. So we've now called it our monthly Business Review Mbre, so we're going to take some copyright on that. And it's with key leadership and appropriate stakeholders and people have an expectation of you're showing up to participate in the conversation and it's not to show up to be informed. You're coming in and formed. All the information that you need to know is already been defined in no K ours. It's in work ward for full transparency and visibility and we use the time very effectively in an hour to talk about risks and roblocks. It are. It's about the key results that are behind plan are showing weakness and the leadership team collaborates on where we need to support each other and how we're going to develop correction plans to get these back to where they need to be. Massively impactful in terms of time savings. I can even share, as we did our Urlone, our leadership retro reset from q four and to que for two thousand and twenty. With our retro we did a celebrate exercise and unanimously the senior leadership team said the transformation from where we were with that monthly business review to our monthly business review is made a significant difference. You know, the other point of that is we're also religious about capturing action items. There's a way and workboard. We have a complementary meeting, we summarize the meeting, action items are documented, owners are assigned and that goes out. We put it in a workstream and workboard and there's an expectation that every month when we come back in the next month, the previous months action items have been updated or closed out and we actually start. That's our first agenda topic. So every Mbr we start with the previous months action items. So it speaks to accountability, because I think this whole...

...process has allowed us to really put some specific ownership on critical outcomes in the business. The the platform and ables visibility and I think inherently helps drive accountability because names are associated, it's visible across the organization. Right we're trying to achieve certain thresholds on certain outcomes and I think that's been a real accelerant to to the execution. What three words describe the impact that Ghx? If you're going to put it in boiled down into just three words, what with those be? But think about the past year and our Ok our process and work board. I think the three words that come to mind for impact would be engagement, clarity and an accelerant for us in the business. First and foremost, it's engagement. Secondly is clarity with what we're working on, why it matters and how people are contributing to the things that matter. And then lastly, I think is third has been an ACCELERAT. There's been a lot of areas where I think we've seen an acceleration and execution in our understanding of why we're working on things, and then the flip side is an accelerant and understanding where we've got gaps and an opportunities for improvement. First and foremost has been engagement. So I think I touched on it a little bit previously, but there was real appetite in our organization for some centralized planning and clarity around strategic priorities, how teams were mobilizing to execute against those in a linked and unified way, and it was so empowering the first few retro reset sessions that we had where teams were getting in rooms and you know, couple my observations that we're just we're so impactful were there was true, a lot just alignment occurring among the team. So Take Ok ours out of the process for a minute. It was a looom way Louis forcing function for the teams to have dedicated time together, and I think I was a little bit naive and thinking that teams certainly meet and they have one on ones and but there's a lot of communication that has to have to happen for teams to be aligned to drive the right outcomes. And when teams first got together there was just massive impact from teams having the right conversations about the right things, which then led into okay, now we're we're all talk in the same language and we understand where we need to go. Now let's put some structure around us and package these in terms of a no K are right and the right key results in the quarter. So I think great engagement with the process. And then, similarly, as we inn tenda and we rolled out work board, this just caught on like wildfire. You know, we were we were deliberate with how we phase this in and we didn't just go all in flip a switch. It took some time and coordination to make sure that, you know, we had the...

...right training and the right capabilities, the right support to get people up the learning curve. But I think once people understood the core competency of workboard as a platform, it's now has become part of language at GCHX. So it's it's really, really exciting to Care Hallway, conversation around people, people talking around key results. Right, and Kurs is just become another acronym, a really powerful Agronhym at Ghx. For us, you know, we speak to OK ours and all of our executive communication, town halls, all employee meetings, quarterly readoubts. It's an agenda topic every time. This has become part of vocabulary and I think it's it's now, and I'll be proud to say this, I think, as we come out of two thousand and twenty, really is become the way that we do work. So with with workboard, different teams have picked up different components of functionality and used it in really, really, I think, impactful ways. We didn't have a centralized reporting platform, you know, and so this gave you. We were intentional about allowing capability across the organization. So everybody that is here at Ghx has the ability to get into workboard. They've got transparenty to see anybody, any other team's quarterly OK ours. You know they can and set up work streams action items. So it's been it's been really, really fun to see different pockets of the organization that didn't have a way to manage their work, you know, not so much a project management software package, but just to a centralized tool to to govern the critical things that have to happen day to day. That helped drive the right value that we need to be delivering every quarter. He's been been great adoption of that whole process. So both with OK ours and workboard. I think that the second word I would use is just clarity. We didn't have a real structured way, outside of traditional forms of communication, whether that was email or some presentations, to speak to what we were standing for for the year right, that the outcomes that we needed to deliver by end of the year, and not just financial performance in the business, but, you know, the things that we're really going to drive impactful growth for our business, the things that we're going to help us maintain our competitive positioning, the true value that we were creating for our customers. This whole process, from top to bottom, now has given us a framework and now, with workboard, a platform to bring this to life and have their be true clarity on where we making bets this coming year. Right, we're very intentional now about talking through what has to be true at the end of the year and then backing into quarter by quarter, what are those critical outcomes that we need to achieve at the exact ecative level, all the way down to frontline teams and aligning those. And so with this process I think there's real clarity...

...on well we're making. We're making bets in these areas and we're not in this area, and I think that's been a real transformative learning for us, because growth in alignment are really, really hard and we didn't have the best processes or mechanisms in the business to make, you know, evaluated, prioritize tradeoff decisions, and this is giving us a lens to say, okay, if this, then that, like here is the outcome and we think this is what this is going to deliver, versus that, and it's it's been a really, really illuminating way for us to evaluate where we're going to make investments. And I think the last word I would use is this has been a real accelrat. I think for speaking back to when we first rolled this out last year and some of the first retcher reset sessions. You know, part of this process is your localizing. It's not a dictate, at least our process is not a it's a combination of tops down meets bottoms up and, as we have our recher reset sessions, everybody has a voice right and they're putting what they need to what they think are priorities and the critical outcomes they need they need to achieve. They put it in their own words right. It's their voice, their contributor to the process. I can emphasize enough how transformative I think that piece of the process has been, where people are just being told what they need to go do. It's we own this and we're contributors and we're supporting the things that need to have to happen across the business, and so that, I think, that contribution mindset has been a real accelerant for individuals feeling like they're more connected to the work that's going on here, our mission, our vision, our values as an organization. I think it's helped accelerate execution and their accountability and their willingness to step up and get the right things done, because I think they have clarity, they know they're working on the right things. There's better direction and I think it's you know, this year I hopefully we can touch on some very specific proof points or this accelerated true strategic and value based outcomes that we delivered to our you know, to our shareholders, to our customers, to our employees here. And I think the the last thing I would say with acceleration is it's accelerated our gaps in our understanding. So that's been really, really powerful for us because I think we're we have a better lens of kind of Eyes Wide Open, where we have opportunities where we need to put time and effort behind it to solve work, rather than, well, this didn't get done and we didn't execute and we just don't really know why or we didn't really care to diagnose why. The beauty of this now is we can't hide from it and we've quickly gone from well, this is uncomfortable and it's still a little bit uncomfortable, to we are fully embracing this and we know why now and there's...

...been massive commitment, I think, across the organization, particularly at the executive level to say that this is the way that we want to do work and it's imperative that we do work this way and we're committed to solving for this. We you know, our growth in the value that we're creating in the market and for our customers is predicated and fundamental by US figuring this out. So where we've got blind spots, where we've got opportunities and gaps to get better at cross functional alignment, we're all in and that's a really challenging but also exciting perspective to bring on this and to have the support in the organization to say we're going to get this right. Right. We're committed to doing this right in what's your favorite feature of Work Board? My favorite feature, I would have to say what I just spoke to is is the the business review component and work board. It's great because it allows you to customize in a lot of different ways. You can keep it team specific with current objectives and key results. You can create different trays that allow you to bring in or query any other team's key results. So we've adopted this and used it in a lot of our weekly leadership meetings. Lay Management Layer by management layer they have their own customized our brs and it allows them to keep focus on their specific quarterly Ok ours, but then they can also pull in other things of interest to them where they need to be informed. Maybe they don't influence it, but they need to be informed so they can help mobilize or help problem solved. In addition to that is the hot box, which we love, which is, you know, it's intended to be. These are the key results that need time, attention and they need to be solved for there in the hot box because they're red. And so again, back to our our monthly business review, we use an our br and it's strictly as just the hot box, right. So we're being very intentional about driving focused attention on the things where we need to drive progress. So it's been a really effective feature set with them work board and it's been really fun to see team by team and leadership team by leadership team pick that up and customized it in their own way. Right. It sounds like you use okrs to manage Okurs and you use the platform yourself day to day to really be the change that you want to see in the rest of the organization. Tell us a little bit about that and how it helps you personally when you think about like your own impact and achievement and so on. How do you use it? What to do for you? Yeah, this process of you know, we, I think we call it, we got to drink the cool aid, right. So in my role, we joke a little bit that on the CEO of okrs at Ghx, and obviously I'm accountable and I've got to be leading by example. So we derive OK ours for being my team to provide governance about not only the rollout of our Ok our process within the organization and things...

...that, you know, we need to make sure the word executing on. So whether that's reducing the cycle time with our retro reset process or launching our our communication plan, working on enhancing training and building communities of practice in the organization with okay are coaches and super users. We define OK ours to govern this process. So it keeps me accountable to driving the right results. And then I also, you know, with other things that are within my scope of responsibility. I'm just like any other team in your organization and I go through the same process that everybody else does and sit in a retro reset with my leader, who happens to be the CFO and determine what the key results are that I'm accountable for delivering, for for rob and for the organization. So I think it's been highly effective to just really embed this is part of the way that I do work and leading by example to show the commitment that we've got behind this process. In terms of one on ones, I think it's hugely impactful, again because of the accountability. So when rob and I meet and have our one on ones, and we're pretty religious about a weekly touch point, it's a quick and easy way for us to use the time effectively. Right. He's a busy guy, I'm a busy guy. We typically meet for thirty minutes or an hour and we both recognize we've got to be in ansitional with the time and this allows us to really cut to the chase. And so I think it's been really powerful because we're putting the appropriate preparation time into making sure we're using the time in the most valuable way. Just want to touch on one other component to US operationalizing this. This program at Ghx has you know, it doesn't scale without what we call and workport supports as a communities of practice so for us that represents dedicated group of volunteer. Okay, our coaches. I can only be in so many places. It's so many points in time right and there's a hundred teams, and so we've had to be very thoughtful and intentional about building this coaching capability in the organization rather than, you know, we're all busy, but rather than use it as oh, it's one more thing that somebody else has to volunteer off for and is on their plate, we've used it in a think, a really, really valuable way where we almost have too many people raising their hands because they see, hey, not only is this a great professional skill set, but we're intentional about rotating coaches across different functions and teams in the organization. So you know, it's very easy, whether you're in, you know, Commercial Roll or development roll or marketing, to only live the purview of where you sit in the organization. And so this has given our coaches a way to get exposure to various different functions, meet new people, create their own connections about some of the work that we're doing and Oh, I didn't know that marketing did that and how it supports this certain thing that I periphilly...

...was involved in. So it's been a really, really constructive way for us to scale this and, frankly, you know, this process wouldn't happen without their support. So it certainly has been necessity, but been super thrilled with the engagement and related to that, as you know, we've tried to be intentional as well about different levels in the organization being part of our coaching community. It's not just people that are individual contributors or managers. You know, we've tried to get we've got senior leaders involved, Middle Management, people that are on the front line. Again, so it's representative of all the different pockets of the organization. And so we've identified super users and gone through certification with workboard. That's another community of practice. Another, I think, highlight for us and part of our evolution this first year was getting religious around the commitment of this and living in a quarterly constructs. And so what that has meant is it's easy to talk to it, but you lose a week and a quarter. It's material and we've had to change the paradigm here all the way from the the top with Howard governing this process on a quarterly cadence and so what that has meant for us is really trying to be religious around adopting the celebrate Monday, calibrate Friday mentality and we've put some really constructive mechanisms in place to support that. So quite a few senior leaders, I say quite a few, or not fully there yet, and I can speak to my experience with rob. We we put that in place the previous quarter and our team made commitment that this was priority. It wasn't. It was important that other things weren't going to come over top of this. The meeting wasn't going to get rescheduled and every week we met we had an hour on the calendar and I would say our you know, the typical theme was forty five minutes were spent in an our our our bere and work board, looking at our quarterly key results. Right, and it wasn't always a readoubt. It was collaborative discussion and sometimes we would get challenged on things, right, but the expectation was results need to be updated. Rob has an expectation hit he's seeing the latest on progress and I think it helped hold all of us accountable and I think that was that made a difference with our execution in the quarter. We would come in on Monday. We knew that that was on the counter, so we would we'd be very intentional. You know, in that meeting as well, probably the last fifteen minutes would be talking through. Okay, now, what are the critical things that each of us are accountable for and need to make sure a priority and need to communicate to our teams to continue to drive execution momentum on our key results so that come Friday a you know, we're excited about celebrating the progress that was made. There's a lot to celebrate when alignment and accountability become an organization superpower. R and that's for sure.

I know you and the leadership team have been so mindful of really owning and using those powers to build and to grow the company and to move the people quote and the culture forward and closure to the customer. We're talking about outcomes and they're quantified and we're diagnosing dependencies and we're having tradeoff discussions and we're challenging each other and we've got a package that we can now go and deliver to the organization to say this is hard, but this is where we're placing our bets in two thousand and twenty and this is how we're using those to place bets, to set the stage for three and five year growth. Here's why. And now we got a place to say here's what's in and equally as importantly, in the business has asked for this. That also means we've got a list of what is out and there's that I think is almost more important for the organization to hear, because I think we, like a lot of organizations, we want to do it all and we chase. We chase a lot of new things and there's a lot of distractions. This process forces structure and clarity and a prioritization. It's not to say that things don't come in make quarter or there's not emergent work. There's a lot of that, but this gives us a framework to say time out. We spend a lot of time and effort defining that. This is what mattered. Something new comes in, something has to come off the plate. We can't just add more and add more. That's not how this process work. So that has just that clarity of this is where we're going. If we need to pivot, we need to pivot and that's part of the beauty of a quarterly construct is every quarter we get that capability and now we might have to adapt to that even more quickly. In a quarter, something big might come in that's a, you know, game changer in the competitive landscape or a business deal. Right, that needs mobilization in the organization. Great, we need to react to that. But now we can put definition around that. Mobilized teams and we've got a way to make a tradeoff to say well, we're putting effort behind that. That's going to take time and resources away from something. It's got to come off X Y Z. What is that Xyz? And so I think there's been real appetite in the business. It's not only know what it is that that we're working on, but what is it that we the leadership team has had to make really hard decisions about what we're not doing, because this is this is all a game of tradeoffs, right. There's only a limited amount of investment that we can make every year and get the right people aligned to deliver those outcomes. And so I think it's been illuminating, and we're leaving in a lot of ways for people to finally see a documented list of the things that we're not doing, because then there's at least there's transparency on it, right, and then there's there's a list of things that, hey, of something changes if we overperform, or there's additional funding that can be freed up, or somebody's going to volunteer part of their budget to help support this initiative. We've already got a we don't have to go through this cycle. It's there. Right, okay, the next thing on the list. Let's reevaluate. Maybe it's instead of number one on top of the list, number three is now the new priority. Pull it in right and it's not this whole new cycle of planning to figure out what the priority should...

...be. So, and that was a real evolution, wasn't it? What I notice is that making choices are very difficult and so so that's a huge change of behavior to go from a one everything these twenty three things. So, you know, focusing only on these six, actually seeing it's okay not to do something. Yeah, yeah, that's a great question in terms of tradeoffs, and that's that's a just difficult part of the DNA, I think a lot of cultures, is to have real structure around that and be convicted right, because you always have to make in perfect decisions with limited information. That's just a fact. And this now, because we're defining outcomes and we're doing it for a bigger list of things, it's giving us a common framework to make more informed, data driven evaluation and decisions on what should be in and what shouldn't shouldn't be in right and why that's been hard is because I think we've often operated with what we want to do, all the things and all the right things, and we've realized we've suffered with some of our execution and we haven't gotten to the end zone. We haven't gone to a hundred percent complete on a lot of things that we wanted to or needed to and and I don't think that's just inherent to us. Are there are any indec dual stories of teams of like certain things that you've experienced in you no kr for to reset or initially that you know, those Aha moments. Have you been there for those Aha moments in what would you what would you share to something stand out? There's a couple anecdotes I would share. I've actually been surprised in some way and related really, really pleased. Our Commercial Organization has jumped into this process and is one of the drivers every quarter to say like get the scheduled and they've been all in and they've used it as a weapon in a really, really constructive way, again to drive clarity and I think they are they were ahead of the curve right. Just as a commercial organs, they're used to dealing in a quarterly construct with Metri be a very quantifiable metrics. We here sometimes, and I gotally, the Commercial Organizations can struggle to adopt O K ours just because they they've kind of got a separate process. They used to doing it. They're old way with, you know, metrics that are governed by quarterly outcomes. But at Jhx they've used this in a sequential way, top down from the senior, you know, the leader of the sales team, team by team, all the way down to each individual sales rep and using it a way to fine these are the areas where we need true focus and we're going to challenge you. Right. So there's there's a real element of the stretch and defining best possible aspirational outcomes that they've...

...just jumped in on in a really, really positive way and it's been used in a way for them to have real, real clarity, I think, on not so much the you know, the sales targets, but again back to leading indicators, some of the really, really important outcomes that the teams need to accomplish to set them up for success to achieve sales targets. And so it's been it's been really fun to watch them embrace this and get better quarter over quarter and in some ways actually use them as one of the best use cases in the organization. For you want to really us see a really tight okay our package, go look at the sales organization. Another great anecdote was with one of our teams in Atlanta and this was a group that is in our customer support organization and these were frontline team, individual contributors, and we had their first rutcher reset and in some ways it was probably a little bit like a therapy session, but in a really, really positive way, where I don't really know what my expectation was going into the the Okur session, but I remember just smiling throughout the entire session because this was a team that, you know, they felt like they had a voice right, which is the beauty of this process, which was hey, I'm you know, their leader was there, I was our facilitating and it wasn't this is the tops down team, is what we're going to go executing the quarter. This was a directive that came down from above. It was here's what we're here to support. Now, you guys all live this day to day. You're the ones that have the best source of information on improven opportunities, that things that we could do literally blew my mind. The the engagement and the collaboration from these were customer support teams, the ideas that they had around, Hey, here are there are certain issues that I face that are thematic and we we did some whiteboarding, we got things package together and then they just totally embrace the whole concept of okay, well, ideally, what we would love to do is if we do these things in this quarter, then this next quarter, you know what the key result should be. Ryan, we're going to reduce the amount of traffic, the amount of call volume traffic, from X to Y. Right. It was the the perfect essence of a key result, which was, let's baseline it, they were already thinking about we think we can drive this kind of reduction. Like here, the problems that we need to solve it was just such a powerful, I think, revelatory experience for all of them to feel like, Hey, somebody's listening, we have a we got great ideas and let's get all these out and then let's figure out let's go through the prioritization exercise. Hey, we get it, we can't do all of this in a quarter. Let's parking lot some of these, but we're all aligne. This team is unified in wow, if...

...we could drive down the amount of call volume that came in because we're delivering better customer service or were more equipped to deliver the right answers and have first contact resolution, that has massive impacts for the organization and for our team and gives us opportunities to do things. So that's just it was a great anecdote of the localization part of this process, which is to me it's the marriage of the tops down on the bottoms up. People had a voice and it felt like, Hey, there's somebody here that's willing to listen and I can be a contributor to this process, and that was one of the things that just they picked it up right. I mean they was some facilitation. They came to a really good package of some quarterly okay, ours, and then we already had thoughts going to the next quarter on kind of back and into what has to be true. Here's where we know. Here's the end zone, right. Ultimately, ultimate success for this this team is the set of key results, very quantifiable. Now let's back into okay, here the critical things and need to have to happen this quarter. Let's get after it. And so to come out of that there was such energy and such alignment and so that just, I think, set precedent for their whole experience. I think it it also caught fire a little bit in the office too, because people talk right and there was like they didn't know what to expect. And part of this is we're still coaching on trust the mess that this is a going to be an uncomfortable thing, right, because you don't come in with the answer all the time and people have to talk through things and alignment's hard and it takes a lot of conversation and communication and you come out of it and sometimes it still feels messy. But that was a perfect example of hey, we all well dove in, we trusted each other, we came out of it in a really, really positive place. And there was clarity right and that I think that energy percolated throughout the office and I think it to this day. The Atlanta team has really run with a lot of the functionality and workboard. You know, we set them up for success and they have just gone off to the races and use it to govern, you know, a lot of personal work. They use it to govern management of teams critical outcomes. They link them the queue results. So it's been really, really fun to see just their whole engagement with okrs and with workboard. Well, what a great experience rand. I know as a coach that feels like you've both given and been given a gift when you can help a team unlock its best possible outcomes. I just let's work. I just love doing as well. Well, let's close there, Ryan and Tiffany, thank you so much for joining us in the conversation today. Cheers. You've been listening to the OKA our podcast. Subscribe in your favorite player so you never miss a moment. Thanks for listening. Until next time,.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (31)